Typographic Education

By the Mergenthaler Linotype Company

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Why Talk About It? (1908)

Why talk about it? the Linotype way is the right way to set telephone directories: here are seventy-four different Linotype ways . (Brooklyn, NY: Mergenthaler Linotype Company, 1908). The Google Books digitization of the University of Michigan copy of this book has not yet been released (as of 2012-10). It is available at The Hathi Trust (Hathi ID: mdp.39015041336051). The icon at left links to a PDF that I reassembled from the Hathi Trust page images of this public domain work.

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Newspaper Headings (1919)

Linotype Newspaper Headings Composed Direct from the Keyboard in Sizes from 6 to 60 Point. (Brooklyn, NY: Mergenthaler Linotype Company, 1919). This book is particularly interesting in its descriptions of the interactions between the machines (and their capabilities) and the typography produced on them. It emphasizes the capabilities of the Model 9 Linotype, the 72-channel magazine Model 20, and the nonmixer Models 8 and 14 (all of these are illustrated). It also, inter alia, shows composition German (blackletter), Greek, Yiddish, Russian, Arabic, and Syriac. The icon here links to a local copy of the Google Books scan of the University of Michigan copy.

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The Manual of Linotype Typography (1923)

Orcutt, William Dana and Edward E. Bartlett. The Manual of Linotype Typography. (Brooklyn, NY: Mergenthaler Linotype Company, 1923).

There are two digital versions of this book online at present. By far the better of the two is the scan of it, available as page images, by the Silver Buckle Press of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. This is online at: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/SilverBuckle.ManualLinotype The icon at left links to this digitization.

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The Manual of Linotype Typography (1923);

Orcutt, William Dana and Edward E. Bartlett. The Manual of Linotype Typography. (Brooklyn, NY: Mergenthaler Linotype Company, 1923).

This is a low-resolution scan of the book from the "Million Books" project, online at The Internet Archive. It really doesn't do justice to the original; the Silver Buckle scan (see above) is much to be preferred. The version here is the "Deja View" (.djvu) format version. The presentation at The Internet Archive is at: http://www.archive.org/details/TheManualOfLinotypeTypography/

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The Legibility of Type (1935/1936)

The Legibility of Type. (Brooklyn, NY: Mergenthaler Linotype Company, 1935).

The copyright date of this work is 1935. The printing code on this copy is "300.01-C-O-15X". The 'O' in this code works out to 1936.

The icon at left links to a presentation of this book at The Internet Archive, where it may be read online conveniently or downloaded in a number of formats. Here is a local copy of the PDF (225 Megabytes): mlc-legibility-of-type-1935-0600rgbjpg.pdf

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Ruled Forms and Leader Work on the Linotype (1928)

[NOT DONE] (312.702, 1928-01 reprint)

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Linotype Keyboard Operation (1930, 1st Ed.)

[NOT DONE] 610.10.

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Ruled Forms and Leader Work on the Linotype (1928)

(312.702-E-N-1X) This version of this pamphlet, which is in the public domain, was posted to the IntertypeWorld newsgroup. It has a slightly different (and I'm guessing later) Mergenthaler printing code than my January 1928 copy (above).

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Heads and Bodies (1946)

[NOT DONE]

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Linotype Keyboard Operation (1958, 4th Ed.)

This is online on Bill Spurling's http://www.linotype.org/.


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