Teletype Model 15 KSR, Base 213102

A General Photographic Survey of the Machine

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1. A Tour Around the Machine

Here's a set of photographs surveying the overall machine as received. It is very difficult to distinguish any detail in a machine this complex in a thumbnail image. In each case, click on each image for a larger version (and then possibly click again to enlarge the second image if your browser automatically shrinks it to fit the window).

Note: I'm photographing under compact fluorescent lights, and I haven't quite got the white balance correct in these. The photographs are distinctly more golden in tone than the machine itself (which is cast aluminum in color, with only a faint golden sheen of old oil). Actually, desaturated these photographs make pretty good black and white images. Perhaps I ought to do this for all of them? The machine was built before color photography became common, after all.

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Here it is with the cover removed:

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2. The Keyboard

(Note: These two photos are the same ones used in the Introduction and Identification Notebok.)

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One thing that isn't apparent from these photographs is that the keycaps are spring-loaded. This keyboard is perhaps 75 years old, and yet in this way is more sophisticated than anything available today.

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3. The Cover

Although I'm calling this a Model 15, I believe that this is really a Cover appropriate for a Model 19 (which is a Model 15 plus a tape perforator). It has both the cut-out appropriate for a perforator (slightly visible on the left in the first photo) and the plate and cut-out for the KEYBOARD / KBD & TAPE / TAPE switch (which is not present).

The copy holder on this Cover is not original to it, and apparently is from a Model 28.

The Cover Glass is not the original glass but a later home-fabricated replacement in acrylic. It is slightly thicker than the original (thus it doesn't fit as well as it should into its left and right channels) and is somewhat crudely cut at the Cover Glass Tearing Edge. Both the copy-holder and the acrylic plate were on the machine as acquired.

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Here's a closer view of the Cover "Glass" and its Tearing Edge. It's perfectly functional, of course.

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Here's the left side. The cutout for the (absent) perforator is clearly visible. The little square door held open by a paperclip is for access to the Range Finder.

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Even I admit that the back of a Model 15 Cover is perhaps not the most exciting view in the world. This is no doubt why there are so very few pictures of it - a fact that might cause great consternation among very meticulous historians of technology 400 years from now. So, to the archaeologists of the 25th century, I send this greeting:

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The right side is much more exciting, with several vents for motor cooling.

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This is just a bit for fun. I should re-do it with better lighting, but it does show the opening of all but one of the panels on the Cover. The little door on the side is for getting to the Range Finder to adjust it.

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Inside, the Cover is lined with sound absorbing material.

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On the left and right are two channels formed of bent sheetmetal, visible above and shown in greater detail below. These channels guide the Cover over two rubber studs on the Teletypewriter Base. This is the only mechanism for locating the Cover relative to the Base.

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Finally, here's a closer view of the front panel slide and some of the sound absorbing material.

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